Anuyoga

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Key Term Anuyoga
Hover Popup Choices Anuyoga; rjes su rnal 'byor
In Tibetan Script ཨ་ནུ་ཡོ་ག
Wylie Tibetan Transliteration anu yo ga
Devanagari Sanskrit Script अनुयोग
Romanized Sanskrit Anuyoga
Tibetan Phonetic Rendering Anuyoga
Sanskrit Phonetic Rendering Anuyoga
English Standard Anuyoga; Subsequent Yoga
Richard Barron's English Term anuyoga
Term Type School
Source Language Sanskrit
Basic Meaning The second set of the three inner tantras and the eighth of the nine vehicles according to the Nyingma tradition. Anuyoga includes many yogini tantras and focuses on the Completion Stage practices of sacred channels, energies and essential fluids and espouses the actualisation of empty bliss.
Has the Sense of Anuyoga is generally associated with lung (ལུང་) or doctrinal teachings, wisdom aspect of the path and female tantras.
Definitions
Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism In Sanskrit, “subsequent yoga” or “further yoga,” the eighth of the nine vehicles (theg pa dgu) of Buddhism according to the Rnying ma sect of Tibetan Buddhism. Here, the system of practice described elsewhere as Anuttarayogatantra is divided into three: m a h ä y o g a , anuyoga, and atiyoga, with anuyoga corresponding to the practices of the “stage of completion” (nispannakrama), mahäyoga to the stage of generation (utpattikram a) and atiyoga to the great completion (rdzogs chen) and the spontaneous achievement of buddhahood. Thus, such stage of completion practices as causing the winds ( p r ä n a ) to move through the channels (nädI) to the cakras are set forth in anuyoga. In Rnying ma, anuyoga is also a category of texts in the Rnying ma’i rgyud ’bum, divided under the following headings: the four root sütras (rtsa ba’i mdo bzhi), the six tantras clarifying the six limits (mtha’ drug gsal bar byed p a i rgyud drug), the twelve rare tantras (dkon rgyud bcu gnyis), and the seventy written scriptures (lung gi yi ge bdun bcu).
Tshig mdzod Chen mo སྔགས་རྙིང་མའི་གཞུང་རྣམས་སུ། རྫོགས་པ་ཨ་ནུ་ཡོ་ག་ནི་སྣོད་བཅུད་ཐམས་ཅད་ལྷའི་རང་བཞིན་དུ་དབྱིངས་ནས་སངས་རྒྱས་པར་རྟོགས་པའི་སྤྲོས་བྲལ་གྱི་མཐའ་གང་དུའང་མ་དམིགས་པའི་རང་བཞིན་གྱིས་ཐབས་བསྐྱེད་པའི་རིམ་པ་ཤས་ཆུང་ཞིང་། རྫོགས་པའི་རིམ་པ་ཤེས་རབ་རྩ་ཐིག་རླུང་གི་རྣལ་འབྱོར་ལ་བརྟན་དབབ་བཟུང་ལྡོག་ཁྱབ་ཀྱི་སྦྱོར་བ་བདེ་སྟོང་གཉིས་སུ་མེད་པའི་ཡེ་ཤེས་བསྐྱེད་ཅིང་། བདེ་གསལ་མི་རྟོག་པའི་གནས་ལུགས་ལམ་དུ་བྱེད་པས་ཚེ་འདིར་གྲོལ་བའི་རང་བཞིན་ཅན་ནོ།།