Trisvabhāva

From Tsadra Commons
Jump to: navigation, search


+ Add to BuNay
View on BuNay

Key Term trisvabhāva
Hover Popup Choices three natures; trisvabhāva
In Tibetan Script རང་བཞིན་གསུམ་
Wylie Tibetan Transliteration rang bzhin gsum
Devanagari Sanskrit Script त्रिस्वभाव
Romanized Sanskrit trisvabhāva
English Standard three natures
Karl Brunnhölzl's English Term three natures
Gyurme Dorje's English Term three natures; three essential natures
Term Type Noun
Source Language Sanskrit
Basic Meaning According to the Yogācāra school, all phenomena can be divided into three natures or characteristics: the imaginary nature parikalpitasvabhāva, the dependent nature paratantrasvabhāva, and the perfect or absolute nature pariniṣpannasvabhāva.
Related Terms parikalpitasvabhāva;paratantrasvabhāva;pariniṣpannasvabhāva
Definitions
TshigmdzodChenmo shes bya sems tsam pa'i lugs la thams cad mtshan nyid gsum du bsdus pa ste/ kun tu brtags pa'i mtshan nyid dang/ gzhan gyi dbang gi mtshan nyid/ yongs su grub pa'i mtshan nyid bcas so/
Synonyms trilakṣana


According to the Yogācāra school, all phenomena can be divided into three natures or characteristics: the imaginary nature parikalpitasvabhāva, the dependent nature paratantrasvabhāva, and the perfect or absolute nature pariniṣpannasvabhāva.

According to the Yogācāra school, all phenomena can be divided into three natures or characteristics: the imaginary nature parikalpitasvabhāva, the dependent nature paratantrasvabhāva, and the perfect or absolute nature pariniṣpannasvabhāva.

Along with Madhyamaka, it was one of the two major philosophical schools of Mahāyāna Buddhism. Founded by Asaṅga and Vasubandhu in the C. 4th Century, many of its central tenets have roots in the Saṃdhinirmocanasūtra and the so-called Third Turning of the Dharma-Wheel (See tridharmacakrapravartana).

The first of the three natures, according to the Yogācāra school. It is the imaginary nature which is falsely projected onto an object out of confusion.

The second of the three natures, according to the Yogācāra school. It is the dependent nature that is used to describe the relationship between mind and its objects, though there is a clear emphasis on the latter. Hence, this nature is concerned with the nature of seemingly external objects that arise in dependence upon causes and conditions.

Though it is sometimes used synonymously with Yogācāra, it is in fact one of the more prominent philosophical theories associated with this school. It asserts that the objects in the external world with which we interact are actually mentally created representations appearing as those objects. The character of these perceptions is predetermined by our own karmic conditioning that is stored in the ālayavijñāna.